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Dating royal doulton pottery

dating royal doulton pottery-67

Ceramic art is art made from ceramic materials, including clay.It may take forms including art ware, tile, figurines, sculpture, and tableware.

Operating originally in London, its reputation grew in The Potteries, where it was a latecomer compared to Royal Crown Derby, Royal Worcester, Wedgwood, Spode and Mintons.These brands are now owned by WWRD Holdings Ltd (Waterford Crystal, Wedgwood, Royal Doulton), based in Barlaston near Stoke-on-Trent.On 2 July 2015 the acquisition of WWRD by the Fiskars Corporation was completed.Some vases and animal figurines were made with a special red glaze called flambe. The multicolored glaze is very thick and looks as if it were dropped on the clay.Bunnykins figurines were first made by Royal Doulton in 1939.Early examples from 1934-1937 may just have the Royal Doulton backstamp on its own with a number next to it, or just the word “bunnykins” below. The registered trademark, R in the circle was added below the bunny’s and dates the piece to between 19 on earthenware. This backstamp is usually found after 1967, English Bone China was added as earthenware was dropped in favour of bone china. People often make the mistake of thinking because it has the date 1936 on it that this is when the item dates to.

An impressed date mark was also used on early Royal Doulton ware, which makes the piece easy to date – eg 9.39 denotes a production date of September 1939. These pieces are also noticeable by the change in colour, as the bone china is more white compared to the cream colour of earthenware. This is incorrect, this backstamp with the copyright is seen on later pieces (1976-1987).

Royal Doulton is the name used on Doulton and Company pottery made from 1902 to the present.

Doulton and Company of England was founded in 1853.

We offer Royal Doulton wares dating back to 1815 when John Doulton founded the company.

His son, Henry Doulton, established the Lambeth and Burslem Studios to create unique art pottery.

Sir Henry was knighted for his services to the ceramic industry and continuing royal patronage from Queen Victoria and King Edward VII led to the title Royal Doulton in 1901.